The Voice | Why You Should Get a Missions Statement on Your Front Door
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Why You Should Get a Missions Statement on Your Front Door

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Last week our client, Kitchen Brains, organized the QPM University – a week-long learning program. The company celebrated its 45th anniversary with the introduction of their new SaaS apps. For the occasion, Kitchen Brains wanted to show their loyal clients their appreciation and decided to invite them to their headquarters in Stratford, Connecticut. Here, clients – among of which was Yum! Brands (KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell) – were given instructions to work with Kitchen Brains’ Quality Production Management (QPM) software and products.

The event gave Kitchen Brains the opportunity to strengthen their existing relationships and to remind their clients how dedicated they are to successfully implementing their product into their clients restaurants, and why they are the right partners in business. To reinforce this message into the heads of their clients, Kitchen Brains wanted to highlight their Mission Statement – a great tool to define the focus and motivation of the company.

The Voice helped refocus this often-overlooked asset and created a wall-mounted display to imprint this message in the minds of the Kitchen Brain’s client. With Kitchen Brains successfully reconnecting with its faithful customers, we would like to take a moment to remind you why your company should have an excellent mission statement!

Over and over scientific articles show that companies with a mission statement perform significantly better. These companies:

1. Connect better with their customers [1]

2. Have improved employee behavior and motivation [2]

3. Hold an outstanding tool for managers assert better leadership [3].

Yet over the years the strength of the mission statement has seemed to be watered down. Mistaking vague and idealistic messages for a mission statement has become the norm and the statements, which are subsequently pushed back to a subpage of the about us section on a website.

Rather than hiding this vital piece of communication, it should actually be promoted internally and outside of each company. The Economist lists three main benefits why you should have a mission statement and why it is important to display your mission statement for everyone to see it.

1. “They help companies to focus their strategy by defining some boundaries within which to operate.”

2. “They define the dimensions along which an organization’s performance is to be measured and judged.”

3. “They suggest standards for individual ethical behavior.”

An article by the New York Times on personal mission statements highlights why they are so important. “By creating a mission statement people can begin to identify the underlying causes of behaviors, as well as what truly motivates them to make changes. “A mission statement becomes the North Star for people,” says Dr. Groppel. “It becomes how you make decisions, how you lead, and how you create boundaries.”

Although creating a mission statement for every individual employee might go a bit too far, there is definitely some wisdom in this. A mission statement can inspire your employees by giving them a sense of direction. It also gives managers something to hold on to when making critical company-changing decisions or when they feel their company is moving off track from its original goals.

However, let’s continue on this individual level for a second. Imagine interviewing two applicants for a marketing position at your firm. Both applicants have similar credentials and seem equally motivated.

You ask them: “What is your mission?”

The first of the applicant’s answers: “I believe that my passion will help me in providing the best work for your company and allow me to excel in the field of marketing.”

The second applicant responds: “By using techniques from my fields of expertise – data analyses and direct marketing. I want to attract new clients from industries relevant to your product.”

You see? The first applicant answered the question with a virtually meaningless statement. The second applicant clearly stated his capabilities and goals, making him a more desirable employee. Defining your mission statement can help your business environment easily understand what your company does and why it is attractive to do business with you.

It is especially important for new and small businesses to adopt a mission statement. According to Inc.com, these companies are constantly searching for new customers, but are also in the process of constantly redefining and realizing their business goals.

As Time magazine explains it: “It can give you a framework for evaluating opportunities and deciding whether they fit your core business model and strategy. It can help you define your business and establish your brand, and it can help your employees focus their efforts and suggest ideas that fit with what you’re trying to do.”

A mission statement is something that you want to shout off the rooftops, because it defines what your company wants – it’s your dream – and that is something to be proud of.

Do you want to know more about the importance of mission statement or what makes an excellent mission statement? Just read one of the articles below or contact The Voice at info@the-voice.com.

·    VIDEO: How To Write Your Mission Statement

·    INC.com: Developing Effective Mission and Vision Statements

·    NY Times: Creating a New Mission Statement

·    The Economist: Mission statement

·    The Entrepreneur: Richard Branson on Crafting Your Mission Statement

·    Forbes: Answer 4 Questions to Get a Great Mission Statement